Scientific themes

STUDYING BIODIVERSITY VIA GENETICS

Context and Objectives For over 20 years, genetics has benefited from the huge development of powerful tools in molecular biology analyses, allowing a large range of applications. Population genetics, one component of this genetic approach, is an important issue for biodiversity management nowadays. This component has been applied to marine resource management in Reunion since 2004, and quickly developed across various scientific programmes. The latter, implemented today thanks to RUN Sea (...)

CONSERVATION OF BIODIVERSITY VIA AQUACULTURE

Context and objectives Coral reef ecosystems represent a considerable challenge for the future whether in relation to the economic activities depending on them or the food security of people in emerging countries. But today coral reefs and their resources (fish, crustaceans, molluscs, and so on) are highly endangered. Such a situation requires the implementation of coastal zone management measures aimed in particular at the preservation of the biodiversity of the coral reef ecosystem and (...)

STUDYING OF BEHAVIOUR VIA BIOLOGGING

Context and objectives Sharks, marine turtles, tuna and seabirds are emblematic species of the marine environment. These animals are top predators represented by more than 1,000 species in the world. The populations of these species are very sensitive to the impacts of fisheries and the environment. They play an important role in ecosystems. RUN Sea Science is a European programme which aims to favour existing studies and to promote future programmes on the ecology of these species in (...)

MONITORING OCEAN ACIDIFICATION

Context and objectives The earth’s oceans are becoming more and more acidic owing to CO2 emissions into the atmosphere (Fig. 1). In an experimental environment, the growth of reef-building organisms (such as corals and calciferous algae), i.e. the quantity of calciferous skeleton deposited by these organisms (“calcification”) decreases with a drop in the pH of the surrounding environment (Figs. 2 and 3). Diminished growth of coral reefs is therefore expected in the course of the 21st century, (...)